We’re Done for the Season

Anyone who has been reading this blog knows that we have been fighting a multi-year fight against invasive weeds. One of them that is both prevalent and absolutely ready to take over every meadow it encounters is the Yellow Star Thistle (YST). We have been working to eradicate it from the Overlook (for at least the last five years) and the Montini (for at least the last three) properties.

As of today, I can report that this year’s campaign is over, and we have triumphed. Last year we found three additional areas that we had not previously been pulling. This year we found an additional one. We cleared them all.

But better than that, we saw this year that areas we had been pulling for several years were now either clear or nearly so. So each year it gets easier and easier to fight it. It has now been reduced so far that basically one person working from May thru July can control it. And subsequent years will be even easier.

I don’t mean to denigrate the threat. Even the new meadow that was discovered this year on the Overlook property meant an additional 8 1/2 bags (see photo, which isn’t all of it) of YST was dragged off the property. But we are seriously seeing progress, and that is worth noting.

But we are also expanding our scope. This year we started tackling the Italian Thistle, which in this wet year had become rampant along the trail. We focused on the trail, and largely removed it, but it also exists in a lot of places off-trail. It remains a challenge. On the Montini property it is so prevalent that it seems unassailable. This is depressing, especially when you know that it will only get worse.

But if you feel inspired by this post, let me know. You won’t be called upon until next May. I have large contractor’s debris bags to hold the spiny plants, and can give advice on how to pull them without serious danger. The only other thing you might need is a glove. And we can make it a group outing that might even have food and/or drink involved.

But be forewarned — if you start on this path, it can easily lead to an obsession. I know this for a fact.

Fencing Volunteer Project at Montini Preserve

Sonoma Ecology Center is setting up deer friendly fencing at Montini Preserve to allow for the continuation of historic grazing on the property. Bill Montinis herd will be let out for some seasonal low-impact grazing to help keep our Oak Woodlands healthy and remove some of the non-native grasses within the park. The grazing will help to reduce invasive species and wildfire fuel loads in the park.

We are looking for extra hands to work with SEC Restoration staff on the installation. Open workdays every Wednesday and Friday from 8-12:00pm starting July 19 through August 4th or until the fence is complete. Volunteers will meet the crew in the morning at 8:00am by the Montini Water Tanks and do work nearby at the Spotted fawn trail. Bring a waterbottle and sunscreen and some good boots, staff will provide all the tools and training.

Many hands makes light work! Come out and join us for a day (or 3!)

We’re Winning!

endofseasonFor the last five years we have been trying to eradicate the Yellow Star Thistle (YST) from the Sonoma Overlook Trail. For the the last three years we’ve also been trying to do the same for the Montini Preserve. Today I ranged all over the SOT upper meadows and emerged with about half a bag of YST. This is a great improvement, and demonstrates that our campaign is making a difference. There is now so little on the Overlook that searching for it may almost be a waste of time, so now I will switch to the Montini, which is likely to still have serious infestations of YST.

This year we also started tackling the purple thistle, which has overrun the Montini but hasn’t yet done so on the Overlook. We focused on getting it off the sides of the trail, as that is a primary way that it spreads. Next year we will begin earlier in the year fighting the purple (YST comes on later in Spring than the purple).

If you want to help out, let me know. I have contractor bags and the only other things you need are a glove and persistence.

Raceway Hike

Thanks to all of you hikers who made donations to raise money for the rehabilitation project on the Overlook Trail this past Saturday. Over 100 hikers gathered at Sonoma Raceway for a special hike that offered 360 IMG_0121degree views, wildflowers in bloom and wooly weeders doing their jobs—we even saw some spring lambs frolicking in the still-green grass.

IMG_0147We had a delicious picnic lunch provided by Levy Restaurant.

 

A huge thank you to Steve Page and his team for the superb job of hosting, promoting, and keeping us all on track over hill and dale.IMG_0139

 

If you’d like more information about how your hiking on the Overlook is even going to be better. . . go to the information on our rehabilitation project that your donations are going to support.

Signs of Spring

Spring is definitely in full swing. Wildflowers such as lupine and California poppies are in profusion, as are the butterflies that frequent the also prevalent Blue dicks (like the Swallowtail pictured).

The trail is mostly no longer muddy (until the next rain, at least), so now is a great time to get out and enjoy the warmth and the wildlife. Just keep your eyes peeled for rattlesnakes, as they have already been sighted on the trail. Other wildlife to look for include squirrels, deer, lizards, and wide variety of birds, from Red-Tailed Hawks to Red-Shafted Flickers to Great Horned Owls (all of which have been sighted from the trails).

Another sign of spring is, well, a sign. We just replaced the sign at the top of the trail that describes a little of the history of the area and names some of the surrounding sights viewable from the upper meadow. On the Overlook Trail, costs such as these are borne by the volunteer Stewards of the Overlook Trail group, which
collaborates with the Sonoma Ecology Center that serves as our fiscal agent. But anything that costs money to maintain or upgrade the trail and property requires us to raise money through events, donations, etc. If you feel so moved, please click on our “Donate Now!” link in the righthand column. Or, come to our next event at the Sonoma Raceway.

In any case, enjoy all of the sights of spring and stay safe out there!

Hikes, Lunch, and Wine at Sonoma Raceway…150mph Hike?

Sonoma Overlook Trail Stewards will host hikes and a picnic lunch at Sonoma Raceway on Saturday, May 13, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. to help raise money for our trail Rehabilitation Project.

Participants can choose a three- or five-mile guided hike through the splendid hills and grasslands of the raceway’s extensive open space to the west of the main facility. Hikes will be guided by docents and Steve Page, Sonoma Raceway’s president and general manager. This property, offering 360-degree views and bayland vistas, is not usually accessible to the public.

The walking is easy and suitable for all ages. An exceptionally wet winter is producing a  spectacular wildflower season, and it’s also an opportunity to see the “woolly weeders” and their spring lambs in action.

Registration is limited and cost is $50 per person, non-refundable and tax-deductible. The cost covers docent-led hikes, a picnic lunch catered by Levy Restaurants, Bedrock wines and non-alcoholic beverages.

Proceeds will go to the Rehabilitation Project that is being undertaken by Sonoma Overlook Trail Stewards, an all-volunteer group that monitors and performs maintenance on the Overlook Trail.

Early registration is advised as a similar event sold out last year. For more information, contact Jeni Nichols, jeninichols@icloud.com, 707-738-3791.

Click Here To Register

Overlook Trail founder is honored

fullsizeoutput_7196Karen Collins, who helped establish the Overlook Trail, has been honored as Sonoma County Woman of the Year for the Third Senate District. Karen has made vital conservation efforts in Sonoma and we appreciate all she does for us hikers and outdoor enthusiasts.

Karen has long been active in local civic and community service. She spearheaded the community effort to preserve the land to the north of town for hikers instead of having a luxury hotel built. She co-chaired the task force that created the trail and is still involved with the volunteer stewards and maintenance and use of the trail.

She currently chairs the Sonoma County Regional Parks and Recreation Commission, which oversees the County’s outdoor recreation programs and is also on the board of Jack London Park Partners, the nonprofit group that operates Jack London State Historical Park. In 2014, she was named the Sonoma Valley “Conservationist of the Year.”

We are lucky to have a dedicated person like Karen that supports the Overlook Trail and outdoor recreation in Sonoma County.

Congratulations Karen.