There’s Never Just One

Tripping down the trail today I thought to myself, “Oh, hey, there’s one!” I had spotted an invasive purple thistle plant at the trail’s edge (see pic). I stooped to pull it out.

As volunteer trail stewards, our remit includes not only maintaining the trails, but also helping the City of Sonoma to maintain their property that the trails traverse. This includes removing invasive species such as broom, purple thistle, and yellow  star thistle.

Purple thistle season begins in early Spring, which means we are already working to remove it. Later in the season the yellow star thistle will start to come in. Since we’ve been attacking the yellow star thistle for several years with vigor, we are seeing some real progress on eradicating it from the Overlook and Montini Preserve properties.

However, purple thistle is quite another story. Mostly due to years of cattle grazing, purple thistle has essentially already overrun the Montini Preserve. So at this point we only focus on yellow star thistle there. But on the Overlook, we think we have a chance to knock back the purple thistle so we are working on it as well. Since we only began our work on it last year, there is still quite a bit of it on the trail.

Today, as I stooped to pull the plant I had spotted I thought to myself, “Oh, wait, there’s five — no ten, crap, there’s a lot!”

I had momentarily forgotten that until the day when we reach the point of eradication — years, perhaps even decades from now (if ever), there’s never just one.

Meditation Hiking

IMG_4132.jpg

Twenty hikers met on Sunday to welcome in Daylight Savings time and to do a meditation hike. Jeff Falconer led the group in a silent hike to the top of the Overlook Trail where the mindful walkers enjoyed the sweeping view with a deep calm. If you’d like more information about enhancing your hikes with the discipline of meditation Jeff’s newly published booklet on Walking Meditation is available for purchase at Readers Books.

Next time you hike, try combining awareness of your breath, your body in motion, and the natural surroundings for an enhanced experience!

 

Join Us for our 3rd Annual 150 mph Hike at The Sonoma Raceway

unnamedWe’re Now Full! Thank You For Your Support!
Join us on May 12 at the Sonoma Raceway for a very unique opportunity to tour remote stretches of the hills and valleys around Sonoma Raceway’s 1,600-acre property and help support a good cause to boot!
This 3 OR 5 mile hike (your choice), will raise funds to support the Sonoma Overlook Trail Maintenance, Restoration, Recreation and Education Programs run by the Sonoma Overlook Trail Stewards, an all-volunteer group that monitors and performs maintenance on Overlook Trail.
Hikes will be guided by Overlook Trail docents and Steve Page, Sonoma Raceway’s President and General Manager. Winding along the hillsides to the west of the main raceway facility we will cover open space that is not normally accessible to the general public.
The walking is easy and suitable for all ages. The route meanders through native grasslands and is timed to coincide with our Spring wildflower bloom. You may even encounter some “Wooly Weeders and their Spring lambs in action! Afterwards, we’ll enjoy a catered lunch including wine or soft drinks.

Date/Time: Saturday, May 12, 2018 – 10 a.m.-1 p.m
Cost: $50 Non-refundable, Tax Deductible Donation 

Includes:
  • Docent Led Hike
  • Lovely picnic lunch catered by Levy Restaurants
  • Highly-acclaimed Bedrock Wines
  • Non alcoholic drinks
  • Jaw Dropping Views!
This event is limited to 75 people. Last year this hike sold out, so register early!

The Removal Season Has Begun

Each Spring we enter “removal season” on the Overlook and Montini properties. We begin with cutting back poison oak from the trail, as the runners begin encroaching as early as early February. So I was out today doing just that (see photo).

It was encouraging, though, as it seemed evident that previous years of cutting back the poison oak was reaping dividends. I was able to cover the bulk of the Overlook trail in one two-hour session.

After poison oak we will be on the lookout for Purple Thistle, as this non-native has been a scourge along the trail. We just started tackling this in earnest last year, so this year it will likely still be bad.

Following the Purple Thistle the Yellow Star Thistle will be coming in, by early March. That will likely keep us busy until early August. However, progress is being made on all these fronts and each year it becomes easier and easier, and some major patches are essentially already gone.

Once we get all these species under control, there are others we will need to tackle. Scotch Broom, for example, is one, although it isn’t as big a problem at the moment as the thistles.

If you want to help with this work, let me know! It basically takes a contractor bag (which I can supply you with) and gloves, although I frequently pull the Yellow Star Thistle gloveless.

Thank You for Beautifying the Trail with Your Tissue

Whenever I turn a corner on the trail and spot a discarded facial tissue (which happens with some frequency) my heart skips a beat. Ahh, I think, some hiker has left something of theirs behind for me. I approach it, casually lean down, pick it up, and slide it surreptitiously into my back pocket, hoping that no one sees me. This is because I am fundamentally selfish. I want the tissue experience to be mine and mine alone.

Just think of the metaphysical implications of the placement of that artifact. Was it left in the middle of the trail, it’s otherworldly whiteness in stark contrast to the reddish brown soil, to spark contemplation about life’s fleeting nature? Or was it deposited just so with folds carefully applied, to make one consider the nature of art? Or perhaps it was discarded almost without thought, as a commentary on the disdain with which the hiker contemplates the natural world that surrounds them.

I guess we will never know if any of these are the reason, unless I happen to witness someone in the act of placement, when I can ask them their intent. Meanwhile, I will continue to gather these symbols of humanity’s fleeting dominion wherever I find them.

Well, that was fun.

But seriously, people, tissues are trash. If you pack it in, pack it out.

Day of Celebration

Today around 50 people came out to celebrate 15 years of the Overlook Trail and offer our gratitude to those who fought to save it, and the town, from the recent fires. State Senator Bill Dodd was in attendance, as well as many local environmental celebrities.

The celebration began with music provided by Paul Genovese and Bob Taylor. After some remarks from Steward Chair Joanna Kemper, the two people most responsible for establishing the trail, Karen Collins and Maggie Salenger, spoke about how the trail came about. A story in the Sonoma Index-Tribune about the celebration also has some of that information.

State Senator Bill Dodd also said a few words and announced that he would donate $500 (a sum that harkens back to a donation of the same amount from State Assemblymember Wes Chesbro when the trail was just getting started). The speakers were followed by a short sing-along of songs of love and appreciation.

Guests enjoyed coffee, apple cider, and muffins before hitting the trail for a hike (naturally). The weather cooperated and the predicted rain held off. About 40 people hiked up to the top and enjoyed the view.

Earth Abides

abide – to endure without yielding

Readers of this blog and locals probably know that during the recent firestorm Cal Fire bulldozers cut fire breaks on the Montini and Overlook properties. We are happy that they did this, as it was essential to protect the town. But nonetheless we were concerned about these scars as we are entering the rainy season.

Cal Fire and the City of Sonoma worked hard to mitigate the impacts of those scars, and that work is already paying off.

The Stewards had planned to meet this morning to spread seed over the cuts, but we canceled due to rain. I went hiking anyway and spotted a lot of grass starting to poke through the straw that was laid down on some of the cuts. This was surprising to me, as bulldozers moved over those cuts not once, but twice (once to make the cut and again to spread the mounds of soil left from the first time) and grass is already coming up.

That’s a really good sign that Mother Nature is going to heal itself, with little intervention from us. We will monitor the situation, and seed where it looks like it needs it, but for now it might just be enough to let nature take its course.