Team Building on the Trail

Today a global technology team took a long hike that started on the Montini Preserve, and finished on the Overlook Trail and Mountain Cemetery. With over 50 people in attendance from all over the world (see the picture to the right), it was something to behold. Attendees were from the U.S., Canada, Israel, Japan, China, the Czech Republic, and who knows where else. They were here in the Bay Area for their annual conference for employees and customers of the Scylla NoSQL parallel database system.

The hike was very ably led by Melissa Beasley and Lisa Turchet, both yoga instructors and hike leaders for The Lodge at Sonoma. Melissa led the hike and Lisa made sure no one was left behind. This hike was part of a “thank you” as well as a team building exercise for the company, as with any very distributed company it can be difficult to build relationships that are challenged by both distance and time zone issues. Having been a part of a global organization, I know these challenges personally. Face time is really important, especially in a relaxed atmosphere such as a nature hike.

So it was good that our trails could be used to build relationships, introduce visitors to the awesomeness that is the Sonoma Valley, and generally show them a good time. Thank you to The Lodge at Sonoma, and particularly to the hike leaders Melissa Beasley and Lisa Turchet, for leading such a great event on our cherished trails!

Star Volunteer Award goes to Joanna Kemper

A well deserved award, “Sonoma Valley Star Volunteer” was presented to Joanna Kemper today at the 11th Annual Celebration for Star Volunteers at Hanna Boys Center, hosted by the Sonoma Valley Fund.

Joanna was the leader of the Sonoma Overlook Trail Stewards for over 9 years, providing guidance, support, and vision to the all-volunteer group that maintains and manages the trail. She’s been a key player in intiating and completing the recent rehabilitation and restoration of the trail. She’s still involved with the trail, providing support and energy to events, trail work and leadership.

Congratulations Joanna!

Paying the Trail Back

Dan Noreen, Beverage Supervisor, David Pye, Director of Engineering, Jay Garrett General Manager, Nathan Wakeen, Senior Rooms Operations Manager, Kaitlyn Tinder Director of Human Resources, Fred Allebach, Trail Steward (not pictured: Bill Wilson and Joanna Kemper, Trail Stewards).

The Lodge at Sonoma Renaissance Resort & Spa has long led hiking trips on the Sonoma Overlook Trail. Under the able leadership of Dan Noreen, Beverage Director and Sommelier, who is also an accomplished naturalist (seriously, where does it stop?), the Lodge offers daily hikes on the trail that are frequently populated by any number of Sonoma visitors, from one to 30 or more. Dan leads a special nature hike on Friday mornings, while on other mornings one of the coterie of the Lodge’s yoga teachers, who hold a class just before, lead a hike. As a daily hiker myself, I know all of them, and welcome them and their groups on a daily basis.

Since the trail is a free and open resource to all, that could be the end of this story. But Dan and his staff want to give back to the trail so they do and have for years. For the last three years the Lodge has coordinated with the Trail Stewards to send a large team on Coastal Cleanup Day. This time the group did a general cleanup and weeding at the trail kiosk and entry steps, and fortified a nearby wood staircase with cement blocks. Trail Stewards Fred Allebach, Joanna Kemper, and Bill Wilson provided materials, tools, and direction.

As always, we greatly appreciate their volunteer efforts to help maintain the trail and the property as the wonderful resource that it is — not just for our local community but also for our valued visitors from around the world. It takes a village, and we’re delighted to have their participation in that community of support.

 

Montini Volunteer Trail Day on Oct. 12, 9:30-12:30

Come out and help the Sonoma Ecology Center maintain the trails of  Montini Preserve with the restoration team. Bring gloves, hat, and water that you can carry hands-free (i.e. bring a backpack). Wear long pants, boots or sturdy shoes and sunscreen. Poison oak is present, so long sleeves are suggested. We have tools and trained staff with tasks for all. Those under 18 years old must be accompanied by an adult. We will provide tools and refreshments for volunteers.

No RSVP required. Meeting at 4th Street Kissing Gate (cross-street is Haraszthy) at 9:30am on Oct. 12th.

MontiniRainbow

Dia de los Muertos — Day of the Dead Cemetery Tour

Please join us for a lively, informative walk through our historic Mountain Cemetery with amateur historian Fred Allebach. Meet cowboys and Indians, ranchers and real estate tycoons, farmers and farriers, carpenters and stone masons, quarry-men, grocers, butchers, bakers, maybe a candlestick maker, and many more!

There is a $35 fee to raise money for maintaining the Overlook Trail.

When

Saturday, November 2, 2019, sign up for one of two hikes: 10:00 AM or 12 Noon — SIGNUP
Add to Calendar

Where

Meet at the Overlook Trail Kiosk
90 First Street West
Sonoma, CA 95476

Questions?

Hope Nisson
Sonoma Overlook Trail
sonomaoverlooktrail@gmail.com

The 2019 Invasive Thistle Removal Season is Over

The weapon of choice: the glove that pulled thousands of thistles.

I’m calling it. Today was the first day I was out on the Montini Preserve and Overlook Trail properties and was unable to spot a single Yellow Star Thistle plant. So I consider this year’s invasive thistle removal season officially over. And what a long road it’s been.

I started pulling Italian thistle at the end of December, when I could pull it and discard it. Later, when blooms began to form we had to bag it in large contractor debris bags and carry it out. We dumped it beside a dumpster in the cemetery, as requested by City staff. As the season progressed, we moved to Yellow Star thistle while the Italian thistle that we couldn’t get to sadly went to seed.

For our next Sonoma Overlook Trail Stewards meeting I will be giving a more formal and complete report, but here it is in a nutshell:

  • Yellow Star Thistle: Although we are clearly making progress, we may be 2-3 years away from complete eradication, except for along Norrbom Road, which has been completely unassailed so far. However, we have reduced the YST so far that we have now given it a setting of “zero tolerance,” which essentially means we are morally obligated to pull everything we see.
  • Italian Thistle: We only recently started to seriously address Italian thistle, and there is a long, long way to go. The Montini Preserve is all but overwhelmed with it, and removal operations were performed mostly along portions of the trail, largely for hiker comfort. On the Overlook, it was successfully removed from the entire trail, back at least 3-6 feet or more. It remains a substantial problem off-trail, although not as bad as the Montini Preserve. We have assigned a status of “calculated and opportunistic,” which means focusing on minimizing its spread by pushing it away from the trail and attacking isolated pockets elsewhere.
  • Scotch/French Broom: There is a bad section of broom near the cemetery that was unaddressed this year, and it is also encroaching on the Toyon Trailhead from the cemetery. Current status: unaddressed.
  • Tocalote: Tocalote is found in scattered areas across the property, but it’s extent is unknown and it remained unaddressed this year.
  • Bellardia: This is also un-assessed and unaddressed but doesn’t seem to be a major problem yet.
  • Others: un-assessed and unaddressed.

We still need to perform a systematic review of invasive species on these properties, but so far our efforts have been focused on removal of those that pose an existential threat to the existence of a diverse ecosystem. And so far we have our hands more than full simply trying to stem the tide.